Set - 5

Question 11 :

Which font names are available on all platforms ?

Answer :

The simple answer is "None" which is why CSS offers five generic font names as 'serif', 'sans-serif', 'cursive', 'fantasy' and 'monospace'. Never put any of these generic font names in quotes.

A CSS aware browser should make a suitable choice from the available fonts in response to each of those generic names. 
Specifying any other font name in a www environment comes out as a suggestion only, that may or may not be acknowledged by a browser. 
The problem with using names of specific fonts is that there is little point in naming fonts that few users will have, so you're down to listing a few mass-market font names. This will then override any superior selection that a minority of discerning readers may have made for themselves. 
Note also that fonts may differ in their character repertoire, but this is often not evident from the font name itself: by selecting an inappropriate font name, you might prevent internationalized content from displaying correctly for a proportion of users.


Question 12 :

What is Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL)?

Answer :

XSL is a proposed styling language for formatting XML (eXtensible Markup Language) documents. The proposal was submitted to the W3C by Microsoft, Inso, and ArborText.


Question 13 :

Document Style Semantics and Specification Language (DSSSL)? 

Answer :

Document Style Semantics and Specification Language is an international standard, an expression language, a styling language for associating processing (formatting and transformation) with SGML documents, for example XML.


Question 14 :

How do I place two paragraphs next to each other? 

Answer :

There are several ways to accomplish this effect, although each has its own benefits and drawbacks. We start with the simplest method of positioning two paragraphs next to each other.

<DIV style="float: left; width: 50%">Paragraph 1</DIV>
<DIV style="float: left; width: 50%">Paragraph 2</DIV>

Trickier is this example, which relies on positioning but does not suffer the vertical-overlap problems which plague many other positioning solutions. The problem is that it relies on an incorrect positioning implementation, and will break down dramatically in conformant browsers.

<P>
<SPAN STYLE="position: relative; left: 50%; width: 50%">
<SPAN STYLE="position: absolute; left: -100%; width: 100%">
Paragraph 1</SPAN>
Paragraph 2</SPAN>
</P>

If floating is not sufficient to your purposes, or you cannot accept display variances in older browsers, then it may be best to fall back to table-based solutions.


Question 15 :

I want my page fonts to look the same everywhere as in&hellip;

a) Why are my font sizes different in different browsers ?
b) Why are my font sizes different on different platforms ?

Answer :

These questions represent the tip of the iceberg of a large topic about which whole essays have been written and a wide range of different views are held. 
The WWW was originally devised to present the same content in different presentation situations and for a wide range of readers: on that basis, "looking the same" is not a design criterion, indeed different presentations would be expected to look different. 
Some would have it that this original aim is no longer relevant, and that the purpose of web design is now to factor out the differences between display situations and put the author in control of the details of the presentation. Others point out that CSS was designed to give the reader a substantial amount of joint control over this process, and that this is desirable, for example to accommodate users with different visual acuity. 
Reading of textual matter on a computer screen is quite a delicate business, what with the relatively coarse pixel structure of a computer display; even with a close knowledge of the display details, it isn't possible to achieve the detailed control that would be possible, say, on a printer. Whatever one's aims, the practical truth is that many of the efforts made to guarantee the precise result on the screen have seriously counterproductive side effects in a www situation. 
The CSS specifications themselves recommend that authors should not use absolute size units in a situation where the properties of the display are unknown. There's a lot to be said for flexible design, that in an appropriate situation looks the way you had in mind, but still successfully conveys content and message in a wide range of other browsing situations. 
And so, before looking at the technical detail of what can be specified, it's strongly suggested that you read some of those essays on web design, and reach your own conclusions as to the strengths and weaknesses of the medium, and how you can best exploit the strengths in a web environment, without falling foul of the weaknesses.