Set - 1

Question 6 :

How comfortable are you with writing HTML entirely by hand?

Answer :

Very. I don't usually use WYSIWYG. The only occasions when I do use Dreamweaver are when I want to draw something to see what it looks like, and then I'll usually either take that design and hand-modify it or build it all over again from scratch in code. I have actually written my own desktop HTML IDE for Windows (it's called Less Than Slash) with the intention of deploying it for use in web development training. If has built-in reference features, and will autocomplete code by parsing the DTD you specify in the file. That is to say, the program doesn't know anything about HTML until after it parses the HTML DTD you specified. This should give you some idea of my skill level with HTML.


Question 7 :

What is everyone using to write HTML?

Answer :

Everyone has a different preference for which tool works best for them. Keep in mind that typically the less HTML the tool requires you to know, the worse the output of the HTML. In other words, you can always do it better by hand if you take the time to learn a little HTML.


Question 8 :

What is a DOCTYPE? Which one do I use?

Answer :

According to HTML standards, each HTML document begins with a DOCTYPE declaration that specifies which version of HTML the document uses. Originally, the DOCTYPE declaration was used only by SGML-based tools like HTML validators, which needed to determine which version of HTML a document used (or claimed to use).
Today, many browsers use the document's DOCTYPE declaration to determine whether to use a stricter, more standards-oriented layout mode, or to use a "quirks" layout mode that attempts to emulate older, buggy browsers.


Question 9 :

How can I include comments in HTML? 

Answer :

Technically, since HTML is an SGML application, HTML uses SGML comment syntax. However, the full syntax is complex, and browsers don't support it in its entirety anyway. Therefore, use the following simplified rule to create HTML comments that both have valid syntax and work in browsers:

An HTML comment begins with "

<!--", ends with "-->

", and does not contain "--" or ">" anywhere in the comment.

* <!-- This is a comment. -->
* <!-- This is another comment,
and it continues onto a second line. -->
* <!---->

Do not put comments inside tags (i.e., between "<" and ">") in HTML markup.


Question 10 :

Can I nest tables within tables? 

Answer :

Yes, a table can be embedded inside a cell in another table. Here's a simple example: 

<table>
<tr>
<td>this is the first cell of the outer table</td>
<td>this is the second cell of the outer table,

with the inner table embedded in it
<table>
<tr>
<td>this is the first cell of the inner table</td>
<td>this is the second cell of the inner table</td>
</tr>
</table>
</td>
</tr>
</table>

The main caveat about nested tables is that older versions of Netscape Navigator have problems with them if you don't explicitly close your TR, TD, and TH elements. To avoid problems, include every </tr>, </td>, and </th> tag, even though the HTML specifications don't require them. Also, older versions of Netscape Navigator have problems with tables that are nested extremely deeply (e.g., tables nested ten deep). To avoid problems, avoid nesting tables more than a few deep. You may be able to use the ROWSPAN and COLSPAN attributes to minimize table nesting. Finally, be especially sure to validate your markup whenever you use nested tables.