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Question 11 :

Should I put quotes around attribute values?

Answer :

It is never wrong to quote attribute values, and many people recommend quoting all attribute values even when the quotation marks are technically optional. XHTML 1.0 requires all attribute values to be quoted. Like previous HTML specifications, HTML 4 allows attribute values to remain unquoted in many circumstances (e.g., when the value contains only letters and digits). 
Be careful when your attribute value includes double quotes, for instance when you want ALT text like "the "King of Comedy" takes a bow" for an image. Humans can parse that to know where the quoted material ends, but browsers can't. You have to code the attribute value specially so that the first interior quote doesn't terminate the value prematurely. There are two main techniques:

* Escape any quotes inside the value with " so you don't terminate the value prematurely: ALT="the "King of Comedy" takes a bow".
* Use single quotes to enclose the attribute value: ALT='the "King of Comedy" takes a bow'.

Both these methods are correct according to the specification and are supported by current browsers, but both were poorly supported in some earlier browsers. The only truly safe advice is to rewrite the text so that the attribute value need not contain quotes, or to change the interior double quotes to single quotes, like this: ALT="the 'King of Comedy' takes a bow".


Question 12 :

Posting Copy and Paste HTML

Answer :

For those wanting to post direct Copy and Paste HTML on screen without the use of spaces or *s etc. and the need to explain those substitutions: Use &lt; to substitute for each opening tag < in each tagged set of HTML. Example, typing the following: &lt;a href="http://www.yourname.com">&lt;img src="http://pics.yourname.com/aw/pics/mask.gif">&lt;/a> Will show up on screen as: <a href="http://www.yourname.com"><img src="http://pics.yourname.com/aw/pics/mask.gif"></a>


Question 13 :

HTML for Lists 

Answer :

1. Bulleted Lists: <ul> begins a bulleted, indented list. Each item in the list is then prefaced with the <li> tag. It is not necessary to insert a break at the end of each line -- the <li> tag automatically creates a new line. 
* with <li type=disc>
* with <li type=square>
* with <li type=circle> 

2. Numbered Lists: <ol> begins a numbered, indented list. Each item in the list is then prefaced with the <li> tag. You need to close the list with the </ol> tag. Note: You can expand the <ol> to specify the TYPE of numbering:
<ol> 1 (decimal numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...)
<ol type="a"> a (lowercase alphabetic: a, b, c, d, e, ...)
<ol type="A"> A (uppercase alphabetic: A, B, C, D, E, ...)
<ol type="i"> i (lowercase Roman numerals: i, ii, iii, iv, v, ...)
<ol type="I"> I (uppercase Roman numerals: I, II, III, IV, V, ...)


Question 14 :

Are there any problems with using tables for layout?

Answer :

On current browsers, the entire table must be downloaded and the dimensions of everything in the table must to be known before the table can be rendered. That can delay the rendering of your content, especially if your table contains images without HEIGHT or WIDTH attributes. 
If any of your table's content is too wide for the available display area, then the table stretches to accomodate the oversized content. The rest of the content then adjusts to fit the oversized table rather than fitting the available display area. This can force your readers to scroll horizontally to read your content, or can cause printed versions to be cropped. 
For readers whose displays are narrower than the author anticipated, fixed-width tables cause the same problems as other oversized tables. For readers whose displays are wider than the author anticipated, fixed-width tables cause extremely wide margins, wasting much of the display area. For readers who need larger fonts, fixed-width tables can cause the content to be displayed in short choppy lines of only a few words each. 
Many browsers are especially sensitive to invalid syntax when tables are involved. Correct syntax is especially critical. Even with correct syntax, nested tables may not display correctly in older versions of Netscape Navigator. 
Some browsers ignore tables, or can be configured to ignore tables. These browsers will ignore any layout you've created with tables. Also, search engines ignore tables. Some search engines use the text at the beginning of a document to summarize it when it appears in search results, and some index only the first n bytes of a document. When tables are used for layout, the beginning of a document often contains many navigation links that appear before than actual content. 
Many versions of Navigator have problems linking to named anchors when they are inside a table that uses the ALIGN attribute. These browsers seem to associate the named anchor with the top of the table, rather than with the content of the anchor. You can avoid this problem by not using the ALIGN attribute on your tables. 
If you use tables for layout, you can still minimize the related problems with careful markup. Avoid placing wide images, PRE elements with long lines, long URLs, or other wide content inside tables. Rather than a single full-page layout table, use several independent tables. For example, you could use a table to lay out a navigation bar at the top/bottom of the page, and leave the main content completely outside any layout tables.


Question 15 :

How do I eliminate the blue border around linked images?

Answer :

In your HTML, you can specify the BORDER attribute for the image: 

<p><a href=...><img src=... alt=... border="0"></a> </p>

However, note that removing the border that indicates an image is a link makes it harder for users to distinguish quickly and easily which images on a web page are clickable.