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Question 6 :

How to transferring user to new web page automatically?

Answer :

You will need to use the below meta tag. 
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Refresh" CONTENT="2"; URL="http://www.yourname.com"> 
Placing the above tag in your <HEAD></HEAD> will load yousite.com in 2 seconds. 
Changing the 2 value on CONTENT="2" to another value will increase or decrease the delay until loading the new page.


Question 7 :

I'm trying to `include' a HTML document in another document...Is there a way to do this? 

Answer :

Yes, there are several ways to do this. But remember, HTML is not a programming language - it doesn't have `directives': it's a markup language, so trying to compare it to C or Pascal is not going to be very meaningful. 

SGML already provides the standard way to do this, using an entry in the DocType Declaration for a file:

<!doctype html public "-//IETF//DTD HTML 3.0//EN" [
<!entity foo system "bar.html">
]>
...
and then later when you want to include the file
...
&foo;

This is the General Entity mechanism used universally in normal SGML work and does exactly what is wanted, with the added benefit that you can have multiple occurrences of &foo; if you need to include some text at more than one place. Unfortunately none of the browsers except Panorama support it, basically because very few of the programmers who write browsers bothered to read up on what can be done.
* The second way is to use the facilities of your server. This has to be enabled by someone with access to the server configuration files (ask your WebMeister). For example, the NCSA server lets you embed a command inside an SGML comment:

<!--#exec cmd="cat myfile.html"-->

Provided this occurs in a file with a special file type (eg .shtml, and this is what has to be specified in the server configuration), the server will parse the file and send out the result of the command embedded in the document. 
* There is in fact a vastly easier way to do this. SGML provides a PI mechanism (Processing Instruction) in the form:

<?cat myfile>

SGML/HTML couldn't care what you put inside (except it must not, for obvious reasons, contain the `>' character!). This would be a great way to specify a page break, for example: suppose you were processing an SGML file using PostScript, you could say <p><?showpage></p>...but again, none of the browsers except Panorama support this, again because they guys who write them have never bothered to actually read up on how SGML works.


Question 8 :

How do I keep people from stealing my source code and/or images?

Answer :

Because copies of your HTML files and images are stored in cache, it is impossible to prevent someone from being able to save them onto their hard drive. If you are concerned about your images, you may wish to embed a watermark with your information into the image. Consult your image editing program's help file for more details.


Question 9 :

The colors on my page look different when viewed on a Mac and a PC.

Answer :

The Mac and the PC use slightly different color palettes. There is a 216 "browser safe" color palette that both platforms support; the Microsoft color picker page has some good information and links to other resources about this. In addition, the two platforms use different gamma (brightness) values, so a graphic that looks fine on the Mac may look too dark on the PC. The only way to address this problem is to tweak the brightness of your image so that it looks acceptable on both platforms.


Question 10 :

How do you create tabs or indents in Web pages?

Answer :

There was a tag proposed for HTML 3.0, but it was never adopted by any major browser and the draft specification has now expired. You can simulate a tab or indent in various ways, including using a transparent GIF, but none are quite as satisfactory or widely supported as an official tag would be.