Exercise 1

Question 1 :

Which of the following statements are true regarding MDBs (Message Driven Beans) on version 6.0 of WebLogic App Server?


A). MDBs support concurrent processing for both Topics and Queues.
B). MDBs support concurrent processing for only Topics.
C). MDBs support concurrent processing for only Queues.
D). MDBs support concurrent processing neither Topics nor Queues.
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

MDBs support concurrent processing for both Topics and Queues. Previously, only concurrent processing for Queues was supported. To ensure concurrency, change the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor max-beans-in-free-pool setting to >1. If this element is set to more than one, the container will spawn as many threads as specified. WebLogic Server maintains a free pool of EJBs for every stateless session bean and message driven bean class. 
The max-beans-in-free-pool element defines the size of this pool. By default, max-beans-in-free-pool has no limit; the maximum number of beans in the free pool is limited only by the available memory.


Question 2 :

The two primary cluster services provided by WebLogic Server are?


A). Http Session State Clustering
B). File Service Clustering
C). Time Service Clustering
D). Object Clustering
E). Event Clustering
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

A WebLogic Server cluster is a group of servers that work together to provide a more scalable and reliable application platform than a single server. A clustered service is an API or interface that is available on multiple servers in the cluster. HTTP session state clustering and object clustering are the two primary cluster services that WebLogic Server provides. WebLogic Server also provides cluster support for JMS destinations and JDBC connections. WebLogic Server provides clustering support for servlets and JSPs by replicating the HTTP session state of clients that access clustered servlets and JSPs. To benefit from HTTP session state clustering, you must ensure that the session state is persistent, either by configure in-memory replication, file system persistence, or JDBC persistence. If an object is clustered, instances of the object are deployed on all WebLogic Servers in the cluster. The client has a choice about which instance of the object to call. This is Object Clustering. The APIs and internal services that cannot be clustered in WebLogic Server version6.0 are File services, Time services, WebLogic Events, Workspaces and ZAC.


Question 3 :

Which of the following are recommended practices to be performed in the ejbPassivate() method of a stateful session bean?


A). Close any open resources, like database connections
B). All non-transient, non-serializable fields(except some special types) should be set to null.
C). All transient fields should be set to null
D). Make all database connection reference fields transient
E). All primitive type fields should be set to null
Answer : Option A, OptionB, Option D

Explanation :

When a bean is about to be passivated, its ejbPassivate() method is invoked, alerting the bean instance that it is about to enter the Passivated state. At this time, the bean instance should close any open resources and set all non transient, non serializable fields to null. This will prevent problems from occurring when the bean is serialized. Transient fields will simply be ignored.Serializable fields will be saved. Open resources such as sockets or JDBC connections must be closed whenever the bean is passivated. In stateful session beans, open resources will not be maintained for the life of the bean instance. When a stateful session bean is passivated, any open resource can cause problems with the activation mechanism. 
A bean's conversational state may consist of only primitive values, objects that are serializable, and the following special types-SessionContext, EJBhome, EJBObject, UserTransaction and Context (only when it references the JNDI ENC) . The types in this list (and their subtypes) are handled specially by the passivation mechanism. They don't need to be serializable; they will be maintained through passivation and restored automatically to the bean instance when it is activated


Question 4 :

While packaging the Web Application DefaultWebApp for deployment into the WebLogic server, the home and remote interfaces of the enterprise beans used by the servlets should reside in which directory?


A). DefaultWebApp/META_INF/classes
B). DefaultWebApp/META_INF/lib
C). DefaultWebApp/WEB_INF/lib
D). DefaultWebApp/WEB_INF/classes
E). DefaultWebApp/classes
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

When packaging a web application create META-INF and WEB-INF subdirectories in the application directory to hold deployment descriptors and compiled Java classes. All servlet classes and helper classes should reside in the WEB-INF/classes subdirectory. The home and remote interface classes for enterprise beans used by the servlets into the WEB-INF/classes subdirectory. 
All the HTML files, JSP files, images, and any other files that these Web pages reference should exist in the application directory, maintaining the directory structure for referenced files. The META_INF directory contains the deployment descriptors for the enterprise beans, but not the classes.


Question 5 :

How many deployment descriptor files does a CMP entity bean deployed on the WebLogic Server have?


A). One J2EE specific deployment descriptor and two WebLogic specific deployment descriptors
B). One J2EE specific deployment descriptor and one WebLogic specific deployment descriptors
C). One J2EE specific deployment descriptor only
D). One WebLogic specific deployment descriptor only
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

Deployment descriptors are text documents formatted with XML tags. The J2EE specifications define standard, portable deployment descriptors for J2EE components and applications. BEA defines additional WebLogic-specific deployment descriptors required to deploy a component or application in the WebLogic Server environment. 
When packaging an enterprise bean, we need to create an ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor in the META-INF subdirectory and add entries for the bean. We also need to create a weblogic-ejb-jar.xml deployment descriptor in the META-INF subdirectory and add entries for the bean. If the bean is an entity bean with container-managed persistence, first we create a weblogic-rdbms-cmp-jar-bean_name.xml deployment descriptor in the META-INF directory with entries for the bean. Then we map the bean to this CMP deployment descriptor with a attribute in the weblogic-ejb-jar.xml file.


Question 6 :

An instance of stateful session EJB when accessed simultaneously from more than one clients on same VM results in RemoteException or EJBException. In case the client is a Servlet thread, which of the following techniques can be used to avoid RemoteException/EJBException?


A). Not possible.
B). Store the reference to the EJB instance as an instance variable of Servlet class.
C). Store the reference to the EJB instance as a local variable of Servlet class.
D). Make the Servlet client to be remote instead of internal to WebLogic server.
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

An instance of a stateful session EJB can be accessed from only one client virtual machine at a time. Multiple client threads from the same virtual machine can access the same instance of a stateful session EJB, but they must do so in a serial fashion. If a client-invoked business method is in progress on an instance when another client-invoked call, from the same or different client, arrives at the same instance of a stateful session bean class, the container may throw the java.rmi.RemoteException to the second client , if the client is a remote client, or the javax.ejb.EJBException, if the client is a local client. Thus choice D is incorrect. 
To avoid any exception, each Servlet should store a reference to a particular EJB instance in a local variable of the Servlet's service() method. Please note that variables local to methods like service(), doGet(), doPost() are not shared between different requests and are automatically thread safe. Thus choice C is correct. An instance variable unlike local variable is shared. Thus Choice B is incorrect. 
An implication of this rule is that an application cannot make loop back calls to a session bean instance. 
This restriction does not apply to a stateless session bean because the container routes each request to a different instance of the session bean class.


Question 7 :

The Multicast TTL setting for a cluster in the WebLogic Admin console sets which of the following values?


A). Maximum time taken for multicast messages to reach their final destination
B). The number of routers a multicast message can pass through before the packet can be discarded
C). The multicast address to be used by the messages sent from the cluster
D). Minimum time taken for broadcasting a multicast message from the cluster
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The Multicast TTL(TTL-Time to Live) setting specifies the number of routers a multicast message can pass through before the packet can be discarded. To configure the multicast TTL for a cluster, you should change the Multicast TTL value in the WebLogic Server administration console. This sets the number of network hops a multicast message makes before the packet can be discarded. 
If you choose to distribute a cluster over a WAN (or across multiple subnets), you must plan and configure your network topology to ensure that multicast messages are reliably transmitted to all servers in the cluster. One of the requirements to be met by the network is that the multicast Time To Live (TTL) value must be high enough to ensure that routers do not discard multicast packets before they reach their final destination.


Question 8 :

Which of the following algorithms is used by the WebLogic Server as the default load balancing strategy for clustered object stubs when no algorithm is specified ?


A). Round-robin
B). Weight-based
C). Random
D). None of the above
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

The basic idea behind load balancing is that by distributing the load proportionally among all the servers in the cluster, the servers can each run at full capacity. WebLogic Server clusters support several algorithms for load balancing clustered objects. The particular algorithm you choose is maintained within the replica-aware stub obtained for the clustered object. Configurable algorithms for load balancing clustered objects are: Round-robin, Weight-based and Random. 
WebLogic Server uses the round-robin algorithm as the default load balancing strategy for clustered object stubs when no algorithm is specified. Round-robin is the only load balancing strategy used by WebLogic proxy plug-ins for HTTP session state clustering. The round-robin algorithm cycles through a list of WebLogic Server instances in order. For clustered objects, the server list consists of WebLogic Server instances that host the clustered object. For proxy plug-ins, the list consists of all WebLogic Servers that host the clustered servlet or JSP.


Question 9 :

Which of the following statements are true regarding the identity of two EJBs?


A). Two stateful session beans are identical if their data attributes are identical.
B). Two stateful session beans are identical if their session contexts are equal.
C). Two stateless session beans are identical if they are of the same type.
D). Two stateless session beans are identical if their session contexts are equal.
E). Two entity beans are identical if they have same primary key but different home interface.
F). Two entity beans are identical if they have different primary key but same home interface.
Answer : Option B, Option C

Question 10 :

In the WebLogic server, if stateless session bean instances are getting frequently created and removed, performance can improved by setting a high value for which of the following?


A). max-beans-in-free-pool
B). max-beans-in-cache
C). max-beans-in-memory
D). max-stateless-beans-in-cache
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

WebLogic Server maintains a free pool of EJBs for every stateless session bean class. The max-beans-in-free-pool element defines the size of this pool. By default, max-beans-in-free-pool has no limit; the maximum number of beans in the free pool is limited only by the available memory. 
When EJBs are created, the session bean instance is created and given an identity. When the client removes a bean, the bean instance is placed in the free pool. When you create a subsequent bean, you can avoid object allocation by reusing the previous instance that is in the free pool. So the max-beans-in-free-pool element can improve performance if EJBs are frequently created and removed. Keeping this parameter too high uses extra memory and keeping it too low causes unnecessary object creation. 
WebLogic Server allows you to configure the number of active beans that are present in the EJB cache (the in-memory space where beans exist). The max-beans-in-cache element specifies the maximum number of objects of this class that are allowed in memory. When max-bean-in-cache is reached, WebLogic Server passivates some EJBs that have not been recently used by a client. Choices C and D are not valid properties.


Question 11 :

Which of the following attributes in the Monitoring tab for a JDBC connection pool in the Administrative console tell us how many clients are currently waiting for a connection?


A). Waiters high
B). Waiters
C). Connections high
D). Clients
E). Wait seconds high
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

JDBC subsystem resources can also be monitored via the Administration Console. The Monitoring tab for a JDBC connection pool allows you to access a table listing statistics for the instances of that pool. These attributes provide important information for managing client database access. 
The Waiters High field indicates the highest number of clients waiting for a connection at one time. The Waiters field tells you how many clients are currently waiting for a connection. The Connections High field indicates the highest number of connections that have occurred at one time. The Wait Seconds High field tells you the longest duration a client has had to wait for a database connection. These attributes allow you to gauge the effectiveness of the current configuration in responding to client requests.


Question 12 :

The MaxPostTimeSecs attribute set in the Administration console under Servers or virtual hosts section corresponds to which of the following?


A). The amount of time that WebLogic Server waits between receiving chunks of data in an HTTP POST.
B). The total amount of time that WebLogic Server spends receiving HTTP POST data.
C). The time spent by WebLogic server to post data to other servers in the cluster.
D). The number of bytes of data received in a POST from a single request.
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

Web servers may face denial-of-service attacks, which is usually carried out by sending huge amounts of data in an HTTP POST method. You can set three attributes in WebLogic Server that help prevent this type of attack. These attributes are set in the console, under Servers or virtual hosts. You can limit the amount of time that WebLogic Server waits between receiving chunks of data in an HTTP POST by setting the attribute PostTimeoutSecs. 
The MaxPostTimeSecs attribute limits the total amount of time that WebLogic Server spends receiving post data. If this limit is triggered, a PostTimeoutException is thrown and a message is sent to the server log. MaxPostSize attribute limits the number of bytes of data received in a POST from a single request. If this limit is triggered, a MaxPostSizeExceeded exception is thrown and a message is sent to the server log.


Question 13 :

A client wants to preserve the reference to the EJBhome object of an enterprise bean instance and use it later. Which of the following can be serialized for this purpose ?


A). home
B). Handle
C). homeHandle
D). EJBhomeHandle
E). homeObject
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

Once a client has obtained the EJBhome object for an EJB instance, it can create a reference to the home object by calling gethomeHandle(). gethomeHandle() returns a homeHandle object, which can be used to obtain the home interface to the same EJB instance at a later time. 
A client can pass the homeHandle object as arguments to another client, and the receiving client can use the handle to obtain a reference to the same EJBhome object. Clients can also serialize the homeHandle and store it in a file for later use. The homeHandle interface has only one method getEJBhome(), which returns the EJBhome reference.


Question 14 :

Match the EJB functions given below with the functionality equivalent in SQL
A.) ejbStore() 
1.) INSERT
B.) ejbLoad() 
2.) UPDATE
C.) ejbCreate() 
3.) SELECT


A). A->1, B->2, C->3
B). A->2, B->1, C->3
C). A->3, B->2, C->1
D). A->1, B->3, C->2
E). A->2, B->3, C->1
F). A->3, B->1, C->2
Answer : Option E

Explanation :

When the create() method on a home interface is invoked, the container delegates the create() method call to the bean instance's matching ejbCreate() method. The ejbCreate() methods are used to initialize the instance state before record is inserted into the database. The ejbCreate() method is analogous to INSERT. The ejbStore() method is invoked just before the container the container is about to write the bean container-managed fields to the database. It is analogous to the UPDATE . The ejbLoad() is invoked just after the container has refreshed the bean container-managed files with its state from the database. It is analogous to the SELECT. Thus choice E is correct and others are not.


Question 15 :

A client invokes a method on a stateful session bean instance deployed in the WebLogic Server. While the method execution is in progress another method call arrives on the server. What will be the result?


A). RemoteException is thrown if the value of concurrency-strategy property is false
B). EJBException is thrown if the value of concurrency-strategy property is false
C). The EJB container blocks the concurrent method call and allows it to proceed when the previous call has completed if the value of allow-concurrent-calls is true
D). In all cases, RemoteException is thrown
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

By default, simultaneous access to a stateful session EJB results in a RemoteException. However, you can set the allow-concurrent-calls option in the WebLogic EJB deployment descriptor to specify that a stateful session bean instance will allow concurrent method calls. This access restriction on stateful session EJBs applies whether the EJB client is remote or internal to WebLogic Server. By default, allows-concurrent-calls is false. However, when this value is set to true, the EJB container blocks the concurrent method call and allows it to proceed when the previous call has completed. 
The concurrency-strategy element determines ejbLoad() and ejbStore() behavior for entity EJB instances.


Question 16 :

Which of the following is NOT true about deploying EJBs in the WebLogic Server?


A). The weblogic/config/examples/applications directory acts as an automatic deployment directory for EJB 2.0 .jar files and EJB .jar deployment directories
B). The automatic redeployment feature of the WebLogic Server can only redeploy an EJB's implementation classes, you cannot redeploy an EJB's public interfaces
C). Before deploying a packaged jar file containing uncompiled EJB classes and interfaces, we have to use weblogic.ejbc on the packaged .jar file to generate WebLogic Server container classes.
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

C is correct because it is NOT true. A and B are true about deploying EJBs in the WebLogic server. The weblogic/config/examples/applications directory acts as an automatic deployment directory for EJB 2.0 .jar files and EJB .jar deployment directories. When you start WebLogic Server, it automatically deploys any valid EJB 2.0 .jar files or .jar directories that reside in the applications directory. WebLogic Server also checks the contents of applications every ten seconds to determine whether an EJB deployment has changed. If a deployment has changed, it is automatically redeployed using the dynamic deployment feature. 
If you change the contents of a compiled EJB .jar file in applications, WebLogic Server automatically attempts to redeploy the .jar using the dynamic deployment feature. Since the automatic redeployment feature uses dynamic deployment, WebLogic Server can only redeploy an EJB's implementation classes. You cannot redeploy an EJB's public interfaces. You create compiled EJB 2.0 .jar files by Compiling your EJB classes and interfaces, packaging the EJB classes and interfaces into a valid .jar file and then Using weblogic.ejbc on the .jar file to generate WebLogic Server container classes. An uncompiled EJB .jar file has the same structure as a compiled file, but you do not have to compile individual class files and interfaces and you do not have to use weblogic.ejbc on the packaged .jar file to generate WebLogic Server container classes. So C is not true.


Question 17 :

Which of the following are valid relationships between JMS objects in the WebLogic Server?


A). A single JMS store can support multiple JMS servers.
B). Multiple consumers may consume from the same queue, but multiple producers may not send to the same queue.
C). Multiple JMS Servers may exist on one WebLogic 6.0 server.
D). A JMS Server can be deployed on only one server.
Answer : Option C, Option D

Explanation :

JMS is an enterprise messaging system, which enables applications to communicate with one another through the exchange of messages. WebLogic JMS provides a full implementation of the JMS API.JMS objects are the objects necessary to connect to the JMS, and send and receive messages. 
The major components of the WebLogic JMS Server architecture include WebLogic JMS servers implementing the messaging facility, Client applications, JNDI and Backing stores (file or database) for storing persistent data. Two or more JMS servers cannot share the same persistent store. Each JMS server must have its own unique persistent store. Two file-based JMS persistent stores may share the same directory, but their messages will be stored in different files. Multiple consumers may consume from the same queue and multiple producers may send messaged to the same queue. Multiple JMS servers may exist on the same WebLogic server, but a JMS server can be deployed only on server at a time.


Question 18 :

Which of the following is NOT true about the security implementation in the WebLogic Server?


A). Servlets, JSPs, EJBs, RMI objects, and Java applications use the Java Authentication and Authorization Service to authenticate WebLogic Server.
B). The default security realm in WebLogic Server is the File realm.
C). The default authentication scheme for WebLogic Server is two-way authentication.
D). An Administration Server may contain configuration information for one WebLogic Server or a cluster of WebLogic servers.
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

C is correct because it is not true about the security in WebLogic server. A,B and D are true. Servlets, JSPs, EJBs, RMI objects, and Java applications use the Java Authentication and Authorization Service to authenticate WebLogic Server. JAAS is a standard extension to the Java 2 Software Development Kit. The authentication component of JAAS provides the ability to reliably and securely maintain client identity, regardless of whether the code is running as a Java application, a JSP, an EJB, an RMI object or a servlet. 
In WebLogic Server, JAAS is layered over the existing Security Service Provider Interface (SPI) allowing the continued use of realm-based authorization. The default security realm in WebLogic Server is the File realm. When WebLogic Server is started, the File realm creates User, Group, and ACL objects from properties defined through the Administration Console in WebLogic Server and stored in the fileRealm.properties file. The File realm is designed for use with 1,000 or fewer users, for more no of users, an alternate security realm should be used. In WebLogic Server, an Administration Server is a WebLogic Server that functions as the central source of all configuration information. An Administration Server may contain configuration information for one WebLogic Server or a cluster of WebLogic servers.


Question 19 :

For EJB applications with bean-managed transaction demarcations, which of the following is used by the client to get a reference to the UserTransaction object for the WebLogic Server domain?


A). JTA
B). JNDI
C). JMS
D). JTS
E). JMX
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

WebLogic Server supports the javax.transaction package and the javax.transaction.xa package, which implement the Java Transaction API (JTA) for Java applications. 
javax.transaction.UserTransaction provides an interface to the transaction manager that allows the application developer to manage the scope of a transaction explicitly. The client application uses JNDI to obtain an object reference to the UserTransaction object for the WebLogic Server domain. 
The code used by the client is given. 

UserTransaction ut=(UserTransaction)jndicontext.lookup("javax.transaction.UserTransaction")

If a bean needs a reference to the UserTransaction object, it obtains it from the EJBContext as given.

UserTransaction ut=ejbContext.getUserTransaction()


Question 20 :

Which of the following are true about the transaction support in the WebLogic server?


A). WebLogic Server allows transactions to be terminated only by the client that created the transaction.
B). WebLogic Server does not support multithreaded transactional clients.
C). A client or a server object cannot invoke methods on an object that is participating in another transaction.
D). WebLogic server supports Nested Transactions
Answer : Option A, Option C

Explanation :

WebLogic Server provides a Transaction Service that supports transactions in EJB and RMI applications. WebLogic Server allows transactions to be terminated only by the client that created the transaction. WebLogic Server implements the flat transaction model. Nested transactions are not supported. 
WebLogic Server supports multithreaded transactional clients. Clients can make transaction requests concurrently in multiple threads. In WebLogic Server, a client or a server object cannot invoke methods on an object that is infected with (or participating in) another transaction. The method invocation issued by the client or the server will return an exception. Also in WebLogic Server, clients using third-party implementations of the Java Transaction API (for Java applications) are not supported.


Question 21 :

Which of the following programs can be created using the ZAC Publish Wizard tool?


A). Installer
B). Deployer
C). Bootstrap
D). Packager
Answer : Option A, Option C

Explanation :

To publish to a WebLogic Server, we can use the ZAC publish wizard. For this, the server must be running, and you will need to know a user and password that has permission to publish. You can also use the ZAC Publish Wizard to create a set of native programs - an installer and a bootstrap - for various operating systems that become part of a published Java application. 
The installer program is a native executable that installs your published Java program on the local machine. It doesn't require a Java environment itself, so it can run out-of-the-box in the native OS. The bootstrap is also a native program; the user runs the bootstrap to invoke the published application. The bootstrap takes care of monitoring for updates, downloading and updating the user's application, and other administrative ZAC functions.


Question 22 :

A stateful session bean implementing the SessionSynchronization interface is deployed on the WebLogic server. Which of the following callback methods may be invoked on the bean?


A). beforeBegin
B). afterBegin
C). beforeCompletion
D). afterCompletion
Answer : Option B, Option C, Option D

Explanation :

A stateful session bean using container-managed transactions can implement the javax.ejb.SessionSynchronization interface to provide transaction synchronization notifications. This interface defines only 3 methods - afterBegin(), beforeCompletion() and afterCompletion(). 
The afterBegin() callback method is called when the bean becomes part of a transaction. It is called before the EJB Object delegates the business method invocation to the bean instance. If the transaction is committed, the bean will be notified through its beforeCompletion() method. If the transaction is rolled back, this method is not invoked. The afterCompletion() method is always invoked whether the transaction ended with a commit or a rollback. A is incorrect because beforeBegin is not a method defined in the SessionSynchronization interface.


Question 23 :

The home of a Product CMP entity bean has a finder method, which returns an Enumeration of all the products whose price falls below a certain value, which is passed as the method argument. If there are no products in the database to match the above criteria what will be the result of a call to this finder method?


A). EJBException is thrown
B). ObjectNotFoundException is thrown
C). NoSuchEntityException is thrown
D). An empty enumeration is returned
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

Find methods that return a single remote reference throw a FinderException if an application error occurs and a ObjectNotFoundException if a matching bean cannot be found. The ObjectNotFoundException is a subtype of FinderException and is only thrown by find methods, which return single remote references. 
The findByPrimaryKey() method returns only one remote reference since there is a one-to-one relationship between a primary key's value and an entity. Find methods that return an Enumeration or Collection type return an empty collection or enumeration if no matching beans can be found or throw a FinderException if an application error occurs. NoSuchEntityException is a system exception thrown by the ejbLoad() method of an entity bean when the database row to be loaded is not found and also by the ejbStore() method when the database row to be updated cannot be found. It is a subclass of EJBException.


Question 24 :

Which is the only method defined in the javax.ejb.Handle interface?


A). getEJBhome
B). getEJBObject
C). getPrimaryKey
D). gethomeHandle
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The Handle is a serializable reference to the EJBObject. The EJBObject.getHandle() method returns a Handle object. The Handle allows us to recreate an EJB object remote reference that points to the same type of session bean or the same unique bean that the handle came from. 
The Handle interface specifies only one method, getEJBObject(). Calling this method returns the EJB Object from which the handle was created. After getting the object back, we can narrow or cast it to the appropriate remote interface type. The getEJBhome method is defined in the homeHandle interface and the getPrimaryKey method in the Entity Context interface. The gethomeHandle method is defined in the EJBhome interface.


Question 25 :

In CORBA, which of the following files generated by the "idltojava" compiler must be compiled before running the server application?


A). Only The Holder Classes
B). Only The Helper and Holder Classes
C). The implementation class(es) written by the user to provide body to the methods defined in the interface class
D). All idltojava generated files (stubs, skeletons, helper, holder and interface classes)
Answer : Option C, Option D

Explanation :

The Helper class (a final class) provides auxiliary functionality, notably the narrow() method required to cast CORBA object references to their proper types. The Holder class provides operations for out and in out arguments, which CORBA has but which do not map easily to Java's semantics. The server application cannot be compiled successfully until the implementation class(es) has/have been written and compiled. All the other generated files however must be compiled to form '.class' files from the '.java' files. Thus all the implementation classes written by the user and all the "idltojava" generated files must be complied to run the CORBA Server.


Question 26 :

Considering the code below, which of the lines of code (given in the choices) should be placed at line 4 to make this JSP prints "My score is : 100"? Please ignore the line numbers for the purpose of validity of the JSP code.

My Progress Report

<% score++; %>
<%= "My score is : " + score %>

 


A). <%! int score = 99; %>
B). <% int score; %>
C). <%@ int score = 99; %>
D). < int score = 99; />
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

The above JSP will work on declaring and initializing the variable score. The syntax for declaring and initializing a variable in JSP is as follows:

<%! variable=variable_value ; %>

Thus A is the correct choice. The <%@ ... %> tag is used to declare directives like include directive. Thus choice C is incorrect. The <% ... %> code is used to insert scriptlet (lines of code in java) like the one at line 5. The code written inside the scriptlet becomes part of the service() method of the generated Servlet. Thus 'score' becomes the local variable of the service method. And for this JSP to compile properly, the variable 'score' should have been initialized. If "<% int score; %>" is replaced by "<% int score=99; %>" , the choice B would also be correct. In the present scenario, the choice B will give compilation error saying "Variable score may not have been initialized". Choice D is incorrect as it's not a valid tag.


Question 27 :

Which of the following are the benefits of MDB (Message Driven Beans) over standard JMS consumers?


A). In case of a MDB, developer needs to create a MessageListener class that utilizes a server-wide session pool.
B). WebLogic Server container provides standard EJB services to MDBs.
C). MDBs benefit from the write-once, deploy-anywhere paradigm of EJBs.
D). MDBs can be associated with multiple Messaging Queues or Topics unlike standard JMS.
Answer : Option B, Option C

Explanation :

A message-driven bean is a special kind of EJB that acts as a message consumer in the WebLogic JMS messaging system. As with standard JMS message consumers, message-driven beans receive messages from a JMS Queue or Topic, and perform business logic based on the message contents. EJB deployers create listeners to a Queue or Topic at deployment time, and WebLogic Server automatically creates and removes message-driven bean instances as needed to process incoming messages. 
Because message-driven beans are implemented as EJBs, they benefit from several key services that are not available to standard JMS consumers. Most importantly, message-driven bean instances are wholly managed by the WebLogic Server EJB container. Using a single message-driven bean class, WebLogic Server creates multiple EJB instances as necessary to process large volumes of messages concurrently. This stands in contrast to a standard JMS messaging system, where the developer must create a MessageListener class that utilizes a server-wide session pool. Thus choice A is incorrect. 
WebLogic Server provides standard EJB services to MDBs, such as security services and automatic transaction management. Thus choice B is correct. 
Being implemented as EJBs, MDBS benefit from the write-once, deploy-anywhere quality of EJBs. Whereas a JMS MessageListener is tied to specific session pools, Queues, or Topics, message-driven beans can be developed independently of available server resources. Thus Choice C is also correct. 
Its not that MDBs are always advantageous as compared to standard JMS consumers. One limitation of MDBs compared to standard JMS listeners is that a given MDB deployment can be associated with only one Queue or Topic. If your application requires a single JMS consumer to service messages from multiple Queues or Topics, you must use a standard JMS consumer, or deploy multiple message-driven bean classes. Thus Choice D is incorrect.


Question 28 :

Which of the statements below is true for a web application using session management?
a.) The session object is invalidated, when the session times out.
b.) The session object is invalidated, when sessionInvalidate() method of HttpSession is invoked.


A). Both of the above statements are true.
B). Only statement a.) is true.
C). Only statement b.) is true.
D). None of the above statements is true.
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The session object will become invalid in either of the following scenarios:
a.) When the session times out.
b.) When invalidate() method of the HttpSession interface is invoked.
Please note that invalidate() and not sessionInvalidate() is the method of HttpSession interface. Thus choice B is correct.