Finding The Output

Question 6 :

What will be the output of the program?

interface Count 
{
    short counter = 0;
    void countUp();
}
public class TestCount implements Count 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        TestCount t = new TestCount();
        t.countUp();
    }
    public void countUp() 
    {
        for (int x = 6; x>counter; x--, ++counter) /* Line 14 */
        {
            System.out.print(" " + counter);
        }
    }
}


A). 0 1 2
B). 1 2 3
C). 0 1 2 3
D). 1 2 3 4
E). Compilation fails
Answer : Option E

Explanation :

The code will not compile because the variable counter is an interface variable that is by default final static. The compiler will complain at line 14 when the code attempts to increment counter.


Question 7 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Base
{ 
    Base()
    {
        System.out.print("Base");
    }
} 
public class Alpha extends Base
{ 
    public static void main(String[] args)
    { 
        new Alpha(); /* Line 12 */
        new Base(); /* Line 13 */
    } 
}


A). Base
B). BaseBase
C). Compilation fails
D). The code runs with no output
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

Option B is correct. It would be correct if the code had compiled, and the subclass Alpha had been saved in its own file. In this case Java supplies an implicit call from the sub-class constructor to the no-args constructor of the super-class therefore line 12 causes Base to be output. Line 13 also causes Base to be output.

Option A is wrong. It would be correct if either the main class or the subclass had not been instantiated.
Option C is wrong. The code compiles.
Option D is wrong. There is output.


Question 8 :

What will be the output of the program?

import java.util.*;
public class NewTreeSet2 extends NewTreeSet 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        NewTreeSet2 t = new NewTreeSet2();
        t.count();
    }
}
protected class NewTreeSet
{
    void count() 
    {
        for (int x = 0; x < 7; x++,x++ ) 
        {
            System.out.print(" " + x);
        }
    }
}


A). 0 2 4
B). 0 2 4 6
C). Compilation fails at line 2
D). Compilation fails at line 10
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

Nonnested classes cannot be marked protected (or final for that matter), so the compiler will fail at protected class NewTreeSet.


Question 9 :

What will be the output of the program?

public class ArrayTest 
{ 
    public static void main(String[ ] args)
    { 
        float f1[ ], f2[ ]; 
        f1 = new float[10]; 
        f2 = f1; 
        System.out.println("f2[0] = " + f2[0]); 
    } 
}


A). It prints f2[0] = 0.0
B). It prints f2[0] = NaN
C). An error at f2 = f1; causes compile to fail.
D). It prints the garbage value.
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

Option A is correct. When you create an array (f1 = new float[10];) the elements are initialises to the default values for the primitive data type (float in this case - 0.0), so f1 will contain 10 elements each with a value of 0.0. f2 has been declared but has not been initialised, it has the ability to reference or point to an array but as yet does not point to any array. f2 = f1; copies the reference (pointer/memory address) of f1 into f2 so now f2 points at the array pointed to by f1.

This means that the values returned by f2 are the values returned by f1. Changes to f1 are also changes to f2 because both f1 and f2 point to the same array.


Question 10 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Super 
{ 
    public Integer getLength() 
    {
        return new Integer(4); 
    } 
} 

public class Sub extends Super 
{ 
    public Long getLength() 
    {
        return new Long(5); 
    } 

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    { 
        Super sooper = new Super(); 
        Sub sub = new Sub(); 
        System.out.println( 
        sooper.getLength().toString() + "," + sub.getLength().toString() ); 
    } 
}


A). 4, 4
B). 4, 5
C). 5, 4
D). Compilation fails.
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

Option D is correct, compilation fails - The return type of getLength( ) in the super class is an object of reference type Integer and the return type in the sub class is an object of reference type Long. In other words, it is not an override because of the change in the return type and it is also not an overload because the argument list has not changed.