Finding The Output

Question 1 :

What will be the output of the program?

class PassA 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        PassA p = new PassA();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        long [] a1 = {3,4,5};
        long [] a2 = fix(a1);
        System.out.print(a1[0] + a1[1] + a1[2] + " ");
        System.out.println(a2[0] + a2[1] + a2[2]);
    }

    long [] fix(long [] a3) 
    {
        a3[1] = 7;
        return a3;
    }
}


A). 12 15
B). 15 15
C). 3 4 5 3 7 5
D). 3 7 5 3 7 5
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

Output: 15 15

The reference variables a1 and a3 refer to the same long array object. When the [1] element is updated in the fix() method, it is updating the array referred to by a1. The reference variable a2 refers to the same array object.

So Output: 3+7+5+" "3+7+5

Output: 15 15 Because Numeric values will be added


Question 2 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Test 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        Test p = new Test();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        boolean b1 = false;
        boolean b2 = fix(b1);
        System.out.println(b1 + " " + b2);
    }

    boolean fix(boolean b1) 
    {
        b1 = true;
        return b1;
    }
}


A). true true
B). false true
C). true false
D). false false
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The boolean b1 in the fix() method is a different boolean than the b1 in the start() method. The b1 in the start() method is not updated by the fix() method.


Question 3 :

What will be the output of the program?

class PassS 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        PassS p = new PassS();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        String s1 = "slip";
        String s2 = fix(s1);
        System.out.println(s1 + " " + s2);
    }

    String fix(String s1) 
    {
        s1 = s1 + "stream";
        System.out.print(s1 + " ");
        return "stream";
    }
}


A). slip stream
B). slipstream stream
C). stream slip stream
D). slipstream slip stream
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

When the fix() method is first entered, start()'s s1 and fix()'s s1 reference variables both refer to the same String object (with a value of "slip"). Fix()'s s1 is reassigned to a new object that is created when the concatenation occurs (this second String object has a value of "slipstream"). When the program returns to start(), another String object is created, referred to by s2 and with a value of "stream".


Question 4 :

What will be the output of the program?

class BitShift 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x = 0x80000000;
        System.out.print(x + " and  ");
        x = x >>> 31;
        System.out.println(x);
    }
}


A). -2147483648 and 1
B). 0x80000000 and 0x00000001
C). -2147483648 and -1
D). 1 and -2147483648
Answer : Option A

Explanation :

Option A is correct. The >>> operator moves all bits to the right, zero filling the left bits. The bit transformation looks like this:

Before: 1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
After: 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0001

Option C is incorrect because the >>> operator zero fills the left bits, which in this case changes the sign of x, as shown.
Option B is incorrect because the output method print() always displays integers in base 10.
Option D is incorrect because this is the reverse order of the two output numbers.


Question 5 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Equals 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x = 100;
        double y = 100.1;
        boolean b = (x = y); /* Line 7 */
        System.out.println(b);
    }
}


A). true
B). false
C). Compilation fails
D). An exception is thrown at runtime
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

The code will not compile because in line 7, the line will work only if we use (x==y) in the line. The == operator compares values to produce a boolean, whereas the = operator assigns a value to variables.

Option A, B, and D are incorrect because the code does not get as far as compiling. If we corrected this code, the output would be false.


Question 6 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Test 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x=20;
        String sup = (x < 15) ? "small" : (x < 22)? "tiny" : "huge";
        System.out.println(sup);
    }
}


A). small
B). tiny
C). huge
D). Compilation fails
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

This is an example of a nested ternary operator. The second evaluation (x < 22) is true, so the "tiny" value is assigned to sup.


Question 7 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Test 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x= 0;
        int y= 0;
        for (int z = 0; z < 5; z++) 
        {
            if (( ++x > 2 ) && (++y > 2)) 
            {
                x++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(x + " " + y);
    }
}


A). 5 2
B). 5 3
C). 6 3
D). 6 4
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

In the first two iterations x is incremented once and y is not because of the short circuit && operator. In the third and forth iterations x and y are each incremented, and in the fifth iteration x is doubly incremented and y is incremented.


Question 8 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Test 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x= 0;
        int y= 0;
        for (int z = 0; z < 5; z++) 
        {
            if (( ++x > 2 ) || (++y > 2)) 
            {
                x++;
            }
        }
    System.out.println(x + " " + y);
    }
}


A). 5 3
B). 8 2
C). 8 3
D). 8 5
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The first two iterations of the for loop both x and y are incremented. On the third iteration x is incremented, and for the first time becomes greater than 2. The short circuit or operator || keeps y from ever being incremented again and x is incremented twice on each of the last three iterations.


Question 9 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Bitwise 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x = 11 & 9;
        int y = x ^ 3;
        System.out.println( y | 12 );
    }
}


A). 0
B). 7
C). 8
D). 14
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

The & operator produces a 1 bit when both bits are 1. The result of the & operation is 9. The ^ operator produces a 1 bit when exactly one bit is 1; the result of this operation is 10. The | operator produces a 1 bit when at least one bit is 1; the result of this operation is 14.


Question 10 :

What will be the output of the program?

class SSBool 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        boolean b1 = true;
        boolean b2 = false;
        boolean b3 = true;
        if ( b1 & b2 | b2 & b3 | b2 ) /* Line 8 */
            System.out.print("ok ");
        if ( b1 & b2 | b2 & b3 | b2 | b1 ) /*Line 10*/
            System.out.println("dokey");
    }
}


A). ok
B). dokey
C). ok dokey
D). No output is produced
E). Compilation error
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The & operator has a higher precedence than the | operator so that on line 8 b1 and b2 are evaluated together as are b2 & b3. The final b1 in line 10 is what causes that if test to be true. Hence it prints "dokey".


Question 11 :

What will be the output of the program?

class SC2 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        SC2 s = new SC2();
        s.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        int a = 3;
        int b = 4;
        System.out.print(" " + 7 + 2 + " ");
        System.out.print(a + b);
        System.out.print(" " + a + b + " ");
        System.out.print(foo() + a + b + " ");
        System.out.println(a + b + foo());
    }

    String foo() 
    {
        return "foo";
    }
}


A). 9 7 7 foo 7 7foo
B). 72 34 34 foo34 34foo
C). 9 7 7 foo34 34foo
D). 72 7 34 foo34 7foo
Answer : Option D

Explanation :

Because all of these expressions use the + operator, there is no precedence to worry about and all of the expressions will be evaluated from left to right. If either operand being evaluated is a String, the + operator will concatenate the two operands; if both operands are numeric, the + operator will add the two operands.


Question 12 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Test 
{
    static int s;
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        Test p = new Test();
        p.start();
        System.out.println(s);
    }

    void start() 
    {
        int x = 7;
        twice(x);
        System.out.print(x + " ");
    }

    void twice(int x) 
    {
        x = x*2;
        s = x;
    }
}


A). 7 7
B). 7 14
C). 14 0
D). 14 14
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

The int x in the twice() method is not the same int x as in the start() method. Start()'s x is not affected by the twice() method. The instance variable s is updated by twice()'s x, which is 14.


Question 13 :

What will be the output of the program?

class Two 
{
    byte x;
}

class PassO 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        PassO p = new PassO();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        Two t = new Two();
        System.out.print(t.x + " ");
        Two t2 = fix(t);
        System.out.println(t.x + " " + t2.x);
    }

    Two fix(Two tt) 
    {
        tt.x = 42;
        return tt;
    }
}


A). null null 42
B). 0 0 42
C). 0 42 42
D). 0 0 0
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

In the fix() method, the reference variable tt refers to the same object (class Two) as the t reference variable. Updating tt.x in the fix() method updates t.x (they are one in the same object). Remember also that the instance variable x in the Two class is initialized to 0.


Question 14 :

What will be the output of the program?

class BoolArray 
{
    boolean [] b = new boolean[3];
    int count = 0;

    void set(boolean [] x, int i) 
    {
        x[i] = true;
        ++count;
    }

    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        BoolArray ba = new BoolArray();
        ba.set(ba.b, 0);
        ba.set(ba.b, 2);
        ba.test();
    }

    void test() 
    {
        if ( b[0] && b[1] | b[2] )
            count++;
        if ( b[1] && b[(++count - 2)] )
            count += 7;
        System.out.println("count = " + count);
    }
}


A). count = 0
B). count = 2
C). count = 3
D). count = 4
Answer : Option C

Explanation :

The reference variables b and x both refer to the same boolean array. count is incremented for each call to the set() method, and once again when the first if test is true. Because of the && short circuit operator, count is not incremented during the second if test.


Question 15 :

What will be the output of the program?

public class Test 
{ 
    public static void leftshift(int i, int j) 
    {
        i <<= j; 
    } 
    public static void main(String args[]) 
    {
        int i = 4, j = 2; 
        leftshift(i, j); 
        System.out.printIn(i); 
    } 
}


A). 2
B). 4
C). 8
D). 16
Answer : Option B

Explanation :

Java only ever passes arguments to a method by value (i.e. a copy of the variable) and never by reference. Therefore the value of the variable i remains unchanged in the main method.

If you are clever you will spot that 16 is 4 multiplied by 2 twice, (4 * 2 * 2) = 16. If you had 16 left shifted by three bits then 16 * 2 * 2 * 2 = 128. If you had 128 right shifted by 2 bits then 128 / 2 / 2 = 32. Keeping these points in mind, you don't have to go converting to binary to do the left and right bit shifts.