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Question 16 :

How do I retrieve a whole row of data at once, instead of calling an individual ResultSet.getXXX method for each column?

Answer :

The ResultSet.getXXX methods are the only way to retrieve data from a ResultSet object, which means that you have to make a method call for each column of a row. It is unlikely that this is the cause of a performance problem, however, because it is difficult to see how a column could be fetched without at least the cost of a function call in any scenario. We welcome input from developers on this issue.


Question 17 :

What are the common tasks of JDBC?

Answer :

Create an instance of a JDBC driver or load JDBC drivers through jdbc.drivers
Register a driver
Specify a database
Open a database connection
Submit a query
Receive results
Process results


Question 18 :

Why does the ODBC driver manager return 'Data source name not found and no default driver specified Vendor: 0'

Answer :

This type of error occurs during an attempt to connect to a database with the bridge. First, note that the error is coming from the ODBC driver manager. This indicates that the bridge-which is a normal ODBC client-has successfully called ODBC, so the problem isn't due to native libraries not being present. In this case, it appears that the error is due to the fact that an ODBC DSN (data source name) needs to be configured on the client machine. Developers often forget to do this, thinking that the bridge will magically find the DSN they configured on their remote server machine


Question 19 :

How to use JDBC to connect Microsoft Access?

Answer :

There is a specific tutorial at javacamp.org. Check it out.


Question 20 :

What are four types of JDBC driver?

Answer :

Type 1 Drivers

Bridge drivers such as the jdbc-odbc bridge. They rely on an intermediary such as ODBC to transfer the SQL calls to the database and also often rely on native code. It is not a serious solution for an application
Type 2 Drivers

Use the existing database API to communicate with the database on the client. Faster than Type 1, but need native code and require additional permissions to work in an applet. Client machine requires software to run.
Type 3 Drivers

JDBC-Net pure Java driver. It translates JDBC calls to a DBMS-independent network protocol, which is then translated to a DBMS protocol by a server. Flexible. Pure Java and no native code.
Type 4 Drivers

Native-protocol pure Java driver. It converts JDBC calls directly into the network protocol used by DBMSs. This allows a direct call from the client machine to the DBMS server. It doesn't need any special native code on the client machine.
Recommended by Sun's tutorial, driver type 1 and 2 are interim solutions where direct pure Java drivers are not yet available. Driver type 3 and 4 are the preferred way to access databases using the JDBC API, because they offer all the advantages of Java technology, including automatic installation. For more info, visit Sun JDBC page