Set - 2

Question 1 :

Why does JComponent have add() and remove() methods but Component does not?

Answer :

because JComponent is a subclass of Container, and can contain other components and jcomponents. How can I implement a thread-safe JSP page? - You can make your JSPs thread-safe by having them implement the SingleThreadModel interface. This is done by adding the directive <%@ page isThreadSafe="false" % > within your JSP page.


Question 2 :

How do I prevent the output of my JSP or Servlet pages from being cached by the browser?

Answer :

You will need to set the appropriate HTTP header attributes to prevent the dynamic content output by the JSP page from being cached by the browser. Just execute the following scriptlet at the beginning of your JSP pages to prevent them from being cached at the browser. You need both the statements to take care of some of the older browser versions.


Question 3 :

How do you restrict page errors display in the JSP page?

Answer :

You first set "Errorpage" attribute of PAGE directory to the name of the error page (ie Errorpage="error.jsp")in your jsp page .Then in the error jsp page set "isErrorpage=TRUE". When an error occur in your jsp page it will automatically call the error page.


Question 4 :

How can I enable session tracking for JSP pages if the browser has disabled cookies?

Answer :

We know that session tracking uses cookies by default to associate a session identifier with a unique user. If the browser does not support cookies, or if cookies are disabled, you can still enable session tracking using URL rewriting. URL rewriting essentially includes the session ID within the link itself as a name/value pair.
However, for this to be effective, you need to append the session ID for each and every link that is part of your servlet response. Adding the session ID to a link is greatly simplified by means of of a couple of methods: response.encodeURL() associates a session ID with a given URL, and if you are using redirection, response.encodeRedirectURL() can be used by giving the redirected URL as input.
Both encodeURL() and encodeRedirectedURL() first determine whether cookies are supported by the browser; if so, the input URL is returned unchanged since the session ID will be persisted as a cookie. Consider the following example, in which two JSP files, say hello1.jsp and hello2.jsp, interact with each other.
Basically, we create a new session within hello1.jsp and place an object within this session. The user can then traverse to hello2.jsp by clicking on the link present within the page.Within hello2.jsp, we simply extract the object that was earlier placed in the session and display its contents. Notice that we invoke the encodeURL() within hello1.jsp on the link used to invoke hello2.jsp; if cookies are disabled, the session ID is automatically appended to the URL, allowing hello2.jsp to still retrieve the session object. Try this example first with cookies enabled. Then disable cookie support, restart the brower, and try again. Each time you should see the maintenance of the session across pages.
Do note that to get this example to work with cookies disabled at the browser, your JSP engine has to support URL rewriting.
hello1.jsp
hello2.jsp
hello2.jsp
<%
Integer i= (Integer )session.getValue("num");
out.println("Num value in session is "+i.intValue());


Question 5 :

What JSP lifecycle methods can I override?

Answer :

You cannot override the _jspService() method within a JSP page. You can however, override the jspInit() and jspDestroy() methods within a JSP page. jspInit() can be useful for allocating resources like database connections, network connections, and so forth for the JSP page. It is good programming practice to free any allocated resources within jspDestroy().
The jspInit() and jspDestroy() methods are each executed just once during the lifecycle of a JSP page and are typically declared as JSP declarations:


Question 6 :

How do I perform browser redirection from a JSP page?

Answer :

You can use the response implicit object to redirect the browser to a different resource, as:
response.sendRedirect("http://www.exforsys.com/path/error.html");
You can also physically alter the Location HTTP header attribute, as shown below:
You can also use the:
Also note that you can only use this before any output has been sent to the client. I beleve this is the case with the response.sendRedirect() method as well. If you want to pass any paramateres then you can pass using >


Question 7 :

How does JSP handle run-time exceptions?

Answer :

You can use the errorPage attribute of the page directive to have uncaught runtime exceptions automatically forwarded to an error processing page.
For example:
redirects the browser to the JSP page error.jsp if an uncaught exception is encountered during request processing. Within error.jsp, if you indicate that it is an error-processing page, via the directive:
the Throwable object describing the exception may be accessed within the error page via the exception implicit object.
Note: You must always use a relative URL as the value for the errorPage attribute.


Question 8 :

How do I use comments within a JSP page?

Answer :

You can use "JSP-style" comments to selectively block out code while debugging or simply to comment your scriptlets. JSP comments are not visible at the client.
For example:
--%>
You can also use HTML-style comments anywhere within your JSP page. These comments are visible at the client. For example:
Of course, you can also use comments supported by your JSP scripting language within your scriptlets.


Question 9 :

Is it possible to share an HttpSession between a JSP and EJB? What happens when I change a value in the HttpSession from inside an EJB?

Answer :

You can pass the HttpSession as parameter to an EJB method, only if all objects in session are serializable. This has to be consider as "passed-by-value", that means that it's read-only in the EJB.
If anything is altered from inside the EJB, it won't be reflected back to the HttpSession of the Servlet Container.The "pass-byreference" can be used between EJBs Remote Interfaces, as they are remote references.
While it IS possible to pass an HttpSession as a parameter to an EJB object, it is considered to be "bad practice" in terms of object oriented design. This is because you are creating an unnecessary coupling between back-end objects (ejbs) and front-end objects (HttpSession). Create a higher-level of abstraction for your ejb's api. Rather than passing the whole, fat, HttpSession (which carries with it a bunch of http semantics), create a class that acts as a value object (or structure) that holds all the data you need to pass back and forth between front-end/back-end.
Consider the case where your ejb needs to support a non-http-based client. This higher level of abstraction will be flexible enough to support it.


Question 10 :

How can I implement a thread-safe JSP page?

Answer :

You can make your JSPs thread-safe by having them implement the SingleThreadModel interface. This is done by adding the directive <%@ page isThreadSafe="false" % > within your JSP page.


Question 11 :

How can I declare methods within my JSP page?

Answer :

You can declare methods for use within your JSP page as declarations. The methods can then be invoked within any other methods you declare, or within JSP scriptlets and expressions.
Do note that you do not have direct access to any of the JSP implicit objects like request, response, session and so forth from within JSP methods. However, you should be able to pass any of the implicit JSP variables as parameters to the methods you declare.
For example:
Another Example:
file1.jsp:
file2.jsp

<%test(out);% >


Question 12 :

Can I stop JSP execution while in the midst of processing a request?

Answer :

Yes. Preemptive termination of request processing on an error condition is a good way to maximize the throughput of a high-volume JSP engine. The trick (assuming Java is your scripting language) is to use the return statement when you want to terminate further processing.


Question 13 :

Can a JSP page process HTML FORM data?

Answer :

Yes. However, unlike Servlet, you are not required to implement HTTP-protocol specific methods like doGet() or doPost() within your JSP page. You can obtain the data for the FORM input elements via the request implicit object within a scriptlet or expression as.


Question 14 :

Is there a way to reference the "this" variable within a JSP page?

Answer :

Yes, there is. Under JSP 1.0, the page implicit object is equivalent to "this", and returns a reference to the Servlet generated by the JSP page.


Question 15 :

How do you pass control from one JSP page to another?

Answer :

Use the following ways to pass control of a request from one servlet to another or one jsp to another.
The RequestDispatcher object 's forward method to pass the control.
The response.sendRedirect method


Question 16 :

Is there a way I can set the inactivity lease period on a per-session basis?

Answer :

Typically, a default inactivity lease period for all sessions is set within your JSPengine admin screen or associated properties file. However, if your JSP engine supports the Servlet 2.1 API, you can manage the inactivity lease period on a per-session basis.
This is done by invoking the HttpSession.setMaxInactiveInterval() method, right after the session has been created.


Question 17 :

How does a servlet communicate with a JSP page?

Answer :

The following code snippet shows how a servlet instantiates a bean and initializes it with FORM data posted by a browser. The bean is then placed into the request, and the call is then forwarded to the JSP page, Bean1.jsp, by means of a request dispatcher for downstream processing.
public void doPost (HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
{
try {
govi.FormBean f = new govi.FormBean();
String id = request.getParameter("id");
f.setName(request.getParameter("name"));
f.setAddr(request.getParameter("addr"));
f.setAge(request.getParameter("age"));

//use the id to compute
//additional bean properties like info
//maybe perform a db query, etc.
// . . .

f.setPersonalizationInfo(info);
request.setAttribute("fBean",f);
getServletConfig().getServletContext().getRequestDispatcher
("/jsp/Bean1.jsp").forward(request, response);
} catch (Exception ex) {
. . .
}
}

The JSP page Bean1.jsp can then process fBean, a
fter first extracting it from the default request
scope via the useBean action.

jsp:useBean id="fBean" class="govi.FormBean" scope="request"/ jsp:getProperty
name="fBean" property="name" / jsp:getProperty name="fBean" property="addr"
/ jsp:getProperty name="fBean" property="age" / jsp:getProperty name="fBean"
property="personalizationInfo" /


Question 18 :

Can you make use of a ServletOutputStream object from within a JSP page?

Answer :

No. You are supposed to make use of only a JSPWriter object (given to you in the form of the implicit object out) for replying to clients.
A JSPWriter can be viewed as a buffered version of the stream object returned by response.getWriter(), although from an implementational perspective, it is not.
A page author can always disable the default buffering for any page using a page directive as:


Question 19 :

How do I include static files within a JSP page?

Answer :

Static resources should always be included using the JSP include directive. This way, the inclusion is performed just once during the translation phase.
The following example shows the syntax:
< % @ include file="copyright.html" % >
Do note that you should always supply a relative URL for the file attribute. Although you can also include static resources using the action, this is not advisable as the inclusion is then performed for each and every request.
How do I have the JSP-generated servlet subclass my own custom servlet class, instead of the default? One should be very careful when having JSP pages extend custom servlet classes as opposed to the default one generated by the JSP engine. In doing so, you may lose out on any advanced optimization that may be provided by the JSPengine.
In any case, your new super class has to fulfill the contract with the JSP engine by: Implementing the HttpJspPage interface, if the protocol used is HTTP, or implementing JspPage otherwise Ensuring that all the methods in the Servlet interface are declared final.
Additionally, your servlet super class also needs to do the following:
The service() method has to invoke the _jspService() method
The init() method has to invoke the jspInit() method
The destroy() method has to invoke jspDestroy()
If any of the above conditions are not satisfied, the JSP engine may throw a translation error. Once the super class has been developed, you can have your JSP extend it as follows:


Question 20 :

Can a JSP page instantiate a serialized bean?

Answer :

No problem! The use Bean action specifies the beanName attribute, which can be used for indicating a serialized bean.
For example:
A couple of important points to note. Although you would have to name your serialized file "filename.ser", you only indicate "filename" as the value for the beanName attribute. Also, you will have to place your serialized file within the WEB-INFjspbeans directory for it to be located by the JSP engine.