Set - 3

Question 11 :

Does XML replace HTML?

Answer :

No. XML itself does not replace HTML. Instead, it provides an alternative which allows you to define your own set of markup elements. HTML is expected to remain in common use for some time to come, and the current version of HTML is in XML syntax. XML is designed to make the writing of DTDs much simpler than with full SGML. (See the question on DTDs for what one is and why you might want one.)


Question 12 :

Do I have to know HTML or SGML before I learn XML?

Answer :

No, although it's useful because a lot of XML terminology and practice derives from two decades' experience of SGML.
Be aware that 'knowing HTML' is not the same as 'understanding SGML'. Although HTML was written as an SGML application, browsers ignore most of it (which is why so many useful things don't work), so just because something is done a certain way in HTML browsers does not mean it's correct, least of all in XML.


Question 13 :

How can I make my existing HTML files work in XML?

Answer :

Either convert them to conform to some new document type (with or without a DTD or Schema) and write a stylesheet to go with them; or edit them to conform to XHTML.
It is necessary to convert existing HTML files because XML does not permit end-tag minimisation (missing
, etc), unquoted attribute values, and a number of other SGML shortcuts which have been normal in most HTML DTDs. However, many HTML authoring tools already produce almost (but not quite) well-formed XML.
You may be able to convert HTML to XHTML using the Dave Raggett's HTML Tidy program, which can clean up some of the formatting mess left behind by inadequate HTML editors, and even separate out some of the formatting to a stylesheet, but there is usually still some hand-editing to do.


Question 14 :

Is there an XML version of HTML?

Answer :

Yes, the W3C recommends using XHTML which is 'a reformulation of HTML 4 in XML 1.0'. This specification defines HTML as an XML application, and provides three DTDs corresponding to the ones defined by HTML 4.* (Strict, Transitional, and Frameset).
The semantics of the elements and their attributes are as defined in the W3C Recommendation for HTML 4. These semantics provide the foundation for future extensibility of XHTML. Compatibility with existing HTML browsers is possible by following a small set of guidelines (see the W3C site).


Question 15 :

If XML is just a subset of SGML, can I use XML files directly with existing SGML tools?

Answer :

Yes, provided you use up-to-date SGML software which knows about the WebSGML Adaptations TC to ISO 8879 (the features needed to support XML, such as the variant form for EMPTY elements; some aspects of the SGML Declaration such as NAMECASE GENERAL NO; multiple attribute token list declarations, etc).
An alternative is to use an SGML DTD to let you create a fully-normalised SGML file, but one which does not use empty elements; and then remove the DocType Declaration so it becomes a well-formed DTDless XML file. Most SGML tools now handle XML files well, and provide an option switch between the two standards.